Elsevier, an information analytics company specializing in science and health, along with the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE), are hosting a 48-hour Medical Education Hackathon on August 25, ahead of AMEE's annual conference in Helsinki, Finland. Building on the success of the 2015 hackathon, the event will bring medical students from across the world together with designers and developers to build creative solutions to solve challenges in medical education today.

Elsevier Hacks is taking applications for up to 16 medical students to attend the global competition. Interested students may apply by sharing the challenge/problem they would like to tackle. The top respondents will go to a second round in which they will create a video that demonstrates how the challenge/problem impacts their day-to-day study of medicine.

"Technology is advancing at a rapid pace, and this event provides us with an opportunity to explore how technology can support and further medical education instead of surpassing it," said Jan Herzhoff, Managing Director, Education, Elsevier. "We want to empower medical students to think beyond the challenges they face in medical education to the solutions that can transform the way medical educators teach and the way they learn."

A team made up of international medical educators from AMEE and Elsevier representatives covering Business, Technology and Product will take part in an immersive experiment and will share their findings during the main AMEE conference on Monday, August 29.

"Hackathons foster creativity and innovation. They push participants to exhausting limits but working within such a tight time frame enables them to create prototype solutions that would not exist outside such an intense ecosystem," said Eric Brown, Senior Director, Software Engineering, Elsevier.

The International Federation of Medical Students' Associations also will run a competition to select two medical students from the conference's student taskforce to take part in the hackathon as AMEE sponsored representatives.