Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and ANSYS are expanding their partnership to transform the future of engineering and research by enabling budding engineers to usher in the next industrial revolution with the opening of ANSYS Hall.

The rapid transformation of manufacturing and product innovation – the next industrial revolution – is underway, and engineers are using simulation to increase innovation, lower cycle times and increase quality with unprecedented speed. ANSYS Hall is a collaborative and hands-on maker facility and education space where students have access to ANSYS' physics-based simulation tools and technologies for making, assembling and testing their designs.

The partnership brings together two leaders in engineering, computation and simulation technologies to encourage opportunities for the exploration of materials and designs at the beginning of the development process. The shared goal is to build groundbreaking approaches and tools that will result in shorter product development cycles and better-quality final products.

The 36,000-square-foot cornerstone learning center expands CMU's maker capabilities with a spacious high-bay building area and design studio with course work areas, fabrication tools and workshops, a computer cluster and multiple collaboration spaces. Professors and students in 18 engineering courses are already using the new ANSYS Hall resources.

"Our long-term partnership with CMU introduces simulation to a new generation of engineers and researchers, giving them the cutting-edge tools they need to create products limited only by their imaginations," said Ajei Gopal, ANSYS president and CEO. "ANSYS Hall supports tomorrow's engineers with the revolutionary simulation technologies they require to succeed in their careers and sets the tone for the future of engineering."

ANSYS and CMU's partnership supports Make Possible: The Campaign for Carnegie Mellon University  . The campaign seeks to raise $2 billion in support of university-wide aspirations, as well as those of its colleges and schools. To date, more than 42,000 donors have contributed more than half of the goal, accelerating CMU's leadership at the nexus of technology and humanity.